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George Eliot - Mary Ann Evans 

George  Orwell - Eric Arthur Blair

Joseph Conrad - Jozef Teoder Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowsti

Lee - G.B. Shaw

O' Henry - William Sydney Porter


Full Name

D.H. Lawrence - David Herbert Lawrence 

E.M. Forster- Edward Morgan Forster

F.R. Leavis - Frank Raymond Leavis

G.B. Shaw - George Bernard Shaw

H.G. Wells- Herbert George Wells

J.M. Synge- John Millington Synge

O'Neill - Eugine O' Neill

P.B. Shelly - Percy Bysshe Shelley

S.T. Coleridge - Samuel Taylor Coleridge 

W.B. Yeats - William Butler Yeats

Pen Name and Full Name Of Authors

Literaturemini | November 18, 2021 | 0 comments

George Eliot - Mary Ann Evans 

George  Orwell - Eric Arthur Blair

Joseph Conrad - Jozef Teoder Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowsti

Lee - G.B. Shaw

O' Henry - William Sydney Porter


Full Name

D.H. Lawrence - David Herbert Lawrence 

E.M. Forster- Edward Morgan Forster

F.R. Leavis - Frank Raymond Leavis

G.B. Shaw - George Bernard Shaw

H.G. Wells- Herbert George Wells

J.M. Synge- John Millington Synge

O'Neill - Eugine O' Neill

P.B. Shelly - Percy Bysshe Shelley

S.T. Coleridge - Samuel Taylor Coleridge 

W.B. Yeats - William Butler Yeats

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It is very important to know about the fathers of different genres of English literature for different types of competitive exams starting from the shadows of English literature.  So simply given here.

Geoffrey Chaucer :

First major poet to write in English

Father of English Literature 

Father of (modern) English Poetry/Poem

William Shakespeare :

National  poet of England 

Nickname: the Swan of Avon

The greatest  dramatist  of all time

The greatest writer  in the English Literature 

The Bard, the Bard of Avon

Caedmon:

First/Earliest English poet

George Bernard Shaw:

Father of modern English Literature 

The greatest modern English Dramatist 

Edmund Spenser :

Poet of Poets

Lord Byron (George Gordon Byron):

Rebel Poet

National Hero of Greek

Percy Bysshe Shelly :

Poet of Skylark and Winds

Revolutionary Romantic Poet

John Keats:

Poet of Beauty 

Romantic Poet

Poet of sensuousness 

William Wordsworth:

Poet of National 

Lake Poet

Samuel  Taylor Coleridge :

Poet of supernaturalism 

Christopher Marlowe:

Father  of English Tragedy 

Venerable Bede:

Father of English History / English Learning 

John Milton:

Epic poet /Great Master of Verse

Jonathan Swift:

The most famous satirist in English literature 

John Donne:

Founder  of Metaphysical poetry/ Poet of Love

Sir Thomas Wyatt:

Father of English Sonnet

John Dryden:

Father of Modern English Criticism 

Alexander Pope:

Mock Heroic Poet

Jane Austen:

Anti-Romantic in the Romantic Age

Alfred the Great:

Founder of English Prose

John Wycliffe, Tyndale, Francis Bacon:

Father of English Prose

Edgar Allan Poe:

Father of English short story

Father of (modern) Detective story

Robert Browning :

Father of Dramatic Monologue 

Nicholas Udall:

First English comedy writer

Thomas kyd :

Father of English Revenge Tragedy 

Ben Jonson :

Father of Comedy of Humours

Jules Verne:

Father of Science Fiction

H.G Wells:

Father of English  Science Fiction 

Francis Bacon :

Father of English essay

Lindley Murray :

Father of English Grammar 

Rudyard Kipling :

First Nobel Prize winner in English literature 

Mark Twain:

Father of American Literature








The Father Of Various Branches Of English Literature

Literaturemini | November 09, 2021 | 0 comments

It is very important to know about the fathers of different genres of English literature for different types of competitive exams starting from the shadows of English literature.  So simply given here.

Geoffrey Chaucer :

First major poet to write in English

Father of English Literature 

Father of (modern) English Poetry/Poem

William Shakespeare :

National  poet of England 

Nickname: the Swan of Avon

The greatest  dramatist  of all time

The greatest writer  in the English Literature 

The Bard, the Bard of Avon

Caedmon:

First/Earliest English poet

George Bernard Shaw:

Father of modern English Literature 

The greatest modern English Dramatist 

Edmund Spenser :

Poet of Poets

Lord Byron (George Gordon Byron):

Rebel Poet

National Hero of Greek

Percy Bysshe Shelly :

Poet of Skylark and Winds

Revolutionary Romantic Poet

John Keats:

Poet of Beauty 

Romantic Poet

Poet of sensuousness 

William Wordsworth:

Poet of National 

Lake Poet

Samuel  Taylor Coleridge :

Poet of supernaturalism 

Christopher Marlowe:

Father  of English Tragedy 

Venerable Bede:

Father of English History / English Learning 

John Milton:

Epic poet /Great Master of Verse

Jonathan Swift:

The most famous satirist in English literature 

John Donne:

Founder  of Metaphysical poetry/ Poet of Love

Sir Thomas Wyatt:

Father of English Sonnet

John Dryden:

Father of Modern English Criticism 

Alexander Pope:

Mock Heroic Poet

Jane Austen:

Anti-Romantic in the Romantic Age

Alfred the Great:

Founder of English Prose

John Wycliffe, Tyndale, Francis Bacon:

Father of English Prose

Edgar Allan Poe:

Father of English short story

Father of (modern) Detective story

Robert Browning :

Father of Dramatic Monologue 

Nicholas Udall:

First English comedy writer

Thomas kyd :

Father of English Revenge Tragedy 

Ben Jonson :

Father of Comedy of Humours

Jules Verne:

Father of Science Fiction

H.G Wells:

Father of English  Science Fiction 

Francis Bacon :

Father of English essay

Lindley Murray :

Father of English Grammar 

Rudyard Kipling :

First Nobel Prize winner in English literature 

Mark Twain:

Father of American Literature








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Dylan Thomas is undoubtedly one of the leading modern poets in English literature. His poems contain some of the basic features of modernism. Though he was not directly related to modern literary movements like surrealism, expressionism or imagist movement, his poetry reflects many of the vital elements of those new trends. In the Fem Hill" his portrayal of the childhood symbolizes an inward journey a modern poet through the corridor of memory for a paradise far from of the decay and degeneration of the contemporary world. Both thematically and structurally this poem can claim to be the representative modern poem.

Modernism  involves a deliberate and radical break with the traditional bases of western culture. The traditional structures of society held by religion, morality and conventional values are being questioned in modern literature. Especially after the First World War man's faith in traditional society and institutions was totally jolted. T. S. Eliot has portrayed in his poems 'the immense panorama of futility and anarchy which is contemporary history'. Dylan Thomas has not been openly critical of his age. However, his poems convey the central features of the new type of poetry. Even in his treatment- of religion Dylan has brought out new ideas. For example, in the picture of childhood we find the religious connotation in the following lines: And the Sabbath rang slowly In the pebbles of the holy streams.

When Sunday came the boy heard the ringing of the church bells which mixed with the sound of the water flowed over the pebbles of the streams. The combination of church bells and streams imply that the divine glory mingled with the innocent joys of childhood made the childhood holier. This touch of religion is more pagan than Christian. Here we notice his attempt to create personal myths out of the old religious terms. Treatment of faith in this manner is an element of modernism.

Dylan Thomas is modern because of his poetic technique. In his 'Fern Hill' he has experimented with different forms, words and images.He gives newness to the much used phrases as in 'below a time", "happy as the grass was green' or 'all the sun long'. In the same way he gives new shape to the stanzas challenging all traditional stanza forms. In "Fem Hill" the stanzas have the shape of flying birds that imitates the flying imagination of the boy. All these are examples of experimentalism which is another feature of modernism.

Apparent obscurity is another feature of modern poetry. In fact, modern poems have so many levels of meanings that sometimes they appear almost incomprehensible. "Fern Hill" also seems obscure because of the elements of surrealism and personal fantasy. Here owls, Thomas gives a surrealistic description of child's fantasies which are unchained by the values of adulthood. The boy's fantasies about nights, night jars and horses presented in a way that seems obscure This is because Thomas takes his style near to the thinking of a child. Things exist only for 'him' and when he is unconscious they do not exist at all. Consequently, it has become obscure, one of the main features of modernism.

Still another feature of modernism is expressionism that we find in "Fern Hill". Expressionism is a movement or tendency that strives to express subjective feelings and emotions rather than to depict reality or nature objectively. In this poem Dylan Thomas has tried to present an emotional experience in its most compelling form. He is not concerned with reality as it appears but with its inner nature and with the emotions dormant in it. To achieve these ends, the childhood in "Fern Hill" is abundantly exaggerated, magnified, or otherwise altered in order to stress the emotional experience in its most intense and concentrated form. In this poem in true expressionistic manner the poet has brought out the uncommon vigour, energy, warmth and vitality of childhood,

As a modern poet Dylan Thomas has combined most of the basic features of modernism. In the 'Fern Hill' we find his finest craftsmanship in the blending of expressionism, experimental images. surrealism, creation of personal myths and unconventional word choice These modern elements have perfected his magic of poetic skill in the "Fern Hill".

Find out the elements of modernism in Thomas's "Fern Hill"

Green Land | June 20, 2021 | 0 comments

Dylan Thomas is undoubtedly one of the leading modern poets in English literature. His poems contain some of the basic features of modernism. Though he was not directly related to modern literary movements like surrealism, expressionism or imagist movement, his poetry reflects many of the vital elements of those new trends. In the Fem Hill" his portrayal of the childhood symbolizes an inward journey a modern poet through the corridor of memory for a paradise far from of the decay and degeneration of the contemporary world. Both thematically and structurally this poem can claim to be the representative modern poem.

Modernism  involves a deliberate and radical break with the traditional bases of western culture. The traditional structures of society held by religion, morality and conventional values are being questioned in modern literature. Especially after the First World War man's faith in traditional society and institutions was totally jolted. T. S. Eliot has portrayed in his poems 'the immense panorama of futility and anarchy which is contemporary history'. Dylan Thomas has not been openly critical of his age. However, his poems convey the central features of the new type of poetry. Even in his treatment- of religion Dylan has brought out new ideas. For example, in the picture of childhood we find the religious connotation in the following lines: And the Sabbath rang slowly In the pebbles of the holy streams.

When Sunday came the boy heard the ringing of the church bells which mixed with the sound of the water flowed over the pebbles of the streams. The combination of church bells and streams imply that the divine glory mingled with the innocent joys of childhood made the childhood holier. This touch of religion is more pagan than Christian. Here we notice his attempt to create personal myths out of the old religious terms. Treatment of faith in this manner is an element of modernism.

Dylan Thomas is modern because of his poetic technique. In his 'Fern Hill' he has experimented with different forms, words and images.He gives newness to the much used phrases as in 'below a time", "happy as the grass was green' or 'all the sun long'. In the same way he gives new shape to the stanzas challenging all traditional stanza forms. In "Fem Hill" the stanzas have the shape of flying birds that imitates the flying imagination of the boy. All these are examples of experimentalism which is another feature of modernism.

Apparent obscurity is another feature of modern poetry. In fact, modern poems have so many levels of meanings that sometimes they appear almost incomprehensible. "Fern Hill" also seems obscure because of the elements of surrealism and personal fantasy. Here owls, Thomas gives a surrealistic description of child's fantasies which are unchained by the values of adulthood. The boy's fantasies about nights, night jars and horses presented in a way that seems obscure This is because Thomas takes his style near to the thinking of a child. Things exist only for 'him' and when he is unconscious they do not exist at all. Consequently, it has become obscure, one of the main features of modernism.

Still another feature of modernism is expressionism that we find in "Fern Hill". Expressionism is a movement or tendency that strives to express subjective feelings and emotions rather than to depict reality or nature objectively. In this poem Dylan Thomas has tried to present an emotional experience in its most compelling form. He is not concerned with reality as it appears but with its inner nature and with the emotions dormant in it. To achieve these ends, the childhood in "Fern Hill" is abundantly exaggerated, magnified, or otherwise altered in order to stress the emotional experience in its most intense and concentrated form. In this poem in true expressionistic manner the poet has brought out the uncommon vigour, energy, warmth and vitality of childhood,

As a modern poet Dylan Thomas has combined most of the basic features of modernism. In the 'Fern Hill' we find his finest craftsmanship in the blending of expressionism, experimental images. surrealism, creation of personal myths and unconventional word choice These modern elements have perfected his magic of poetic skill in the "Fern Hill".

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Ted Hughes had been obsessed with animals from early years. Many of his famous poems are based on animals. "The Jaguar", "Pike", "The Horses", "The Bull Moses", "An Otter", "Thrushes" and "Crow" are a few of many of his poems dealing with animals. The poem, "Pike" is an excellent example of Hughes' gift for imagining and describing nature at her most violent and predatory shape. It seeks the root of primitive energy, which is violent, irrational and deadly. Hughes in this poem recognises the primordial violent energy that defies and threatens all kinds of subordination to rational consciousness. Here lies human interest in the poem. So, "Pike" is a fine poem representing Hughes' pre-occupation with animals, his recognition of the violent primitive energy and his art of relating an animal with the primordial natural force in man.The poet suggests the violent and deadly nature of the pike in the beginning of the poem. It opens with an objective detail of the fish:

Pike, three inches long, perfect, Pike in all parts, green tigering the gold.Killers from the egg: The malevolent aged grin.They dance...

The words "tigering", "Killers" "malevolent" and "grin" imply that the dance is a macabre celebration of timeless instinctive destructiveness. The first four stanzas present the primitive horror in the subject-creature, the pike, through a series of evocative noun phrases. The I-speaker appears in the fifth stanza and reinforces the violence and horror in the pike through three brief anecdotes.

The first reference is to three pikes kept in an aquarium. The strongest of them ate up the other two. The second reference is to "Two, six pounds each", which killed each other in the willow-herb. The third is a reference to the pikes of giant size living in an old pond. These pikes are the embodiment of the mysterious foreboding inherent in nature. The speaker's experiences from these three incidents not only reaffirm the horror of the killer-fish but also gradually intensify the violence and mystery in the heart of man and nature.

So, the speaker in "Pike" recognises the inseparable primitive energy in animals. He becomes aware that the primitive violence is the evil "otherness", the animality in man.

Explain that "Pike" deals with primitive energy

Green Land | June 20, 2021 | 0 comments

Ted Hughes had been obsessed with animals from early years. Many of his famous poems are based on animals. "The Jaguar", "Pike", "The Horses", "The Bull Moses", "An Otter", "Thrushes" and "Crow" are a few of many of his poems dealing with animals. The poem, "Pike" is an excellent example of Hughes' gift for imagining and describing nature at her most violent and predatory shape. It seeks the root of primitive energy, which is violent, irrational and deadly. Hughes in this poem recognises the primordial violent energy that defies and threatens all kinds of subordination to rational consciousness. Here lies human interest in the poem. So, "Pike" is a fine poem representing Hughes' pre-occupation with animals, his recognition of the violent primitive energy and his art of relating an animal with the primordial natural force in man.The poet suggests the violent and deadly nature of the pike in the beginning of the poem. It opens with an objective detail of the fish:

Pike, three inches long, perfect, Pike in all parts, green tigering the gold.Killers from the egg: The malevolent aged grin.They dance...

The words "tigering", "Killers" "malevolent" and "grin" imply that the dance is a macabre celebration of timeless instinctive destructiveness. The first four stanzas present the primitive horror in the subject-creature, the pike, through a series of evocative noun phrases. The I-speaker appears in the fifth stanza and reinforces the violence and horror in the pike through three brief anecdotes.

The first reference is to three pikes kept in an aquarium. The strongest of them ate up the other two. The second reference is to "Two, six pounds each", which killed each other in the willow-herb. The third is a reference to the pikes of giant size living in an old pond. These pikes are the embodiment of the mysterious foreboding inherent in nature. The speaker's experiences from these three incidents not only reaffirm the horror of the killer-fish but also gradually intensify the violence and mystery in the heart of man and nature.

So, the speaker in "Pike" recognises the inseparable primitive energy in animals. He becomes aware that the primitive violence is the evil "otherness", the animality in man.

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Ted Hughes had so been obsessed with animals that people humorously called him a "Zoo Laureate". Indeed many of his famous poems are based on animals. "The Jaguar", "Pike", "The Horses"," Bull Moses", "An Otter", "Thrushes" and "Crow" are a few of many of his poems dealing with animals. However, though his primary subjects are animals, his main focus is on man. He believed that the primitive energy in man was on the verge of extinction because of the continuous domination of rational consciousness. The poem, "Pike" is an excellent example of Hughes' gift for imagining and describing nature at her most violent and predatory shape. It seeks the root of primitive energy, which is violent, irrational and deadly. Hughes in this poem recognizes the primordial violent energy that defies and threatens all kinds of subordination to rational consciousness. Here lies human interest in the poem. So, "Pike" is a fine poem representing Hughes' pre-occupation with animals, his recognition of the violent primitive energy and his art of relating an animal with the primordial natural force in man.

The poet suggests the violent and deadly nature of the pike in the beginning of the poem. It opens with an objective detail of the fish:

Pike, three inches long, perfect,Pike in all parts, green tigering the gold.Killers from the egg: The malevolent aged grin.They dance...

The words "tigering", "Killers" "malevolent" and "grin" imply that the dance is a macabre celebration of timeless instinctive destructiveness. The first four stanzas present the primitive horror in the subject-creature, the pike, through a series of evocative noun phrases. The speaker appears in the fifth stanza and reinforces the violence and horror in the pike through three brief anecdotes.

The first reference is to three pikes kept in an aquarium. The strongest of them ate up the other two. The second reference is to "Two, six pounds each", which killed each other in the willow-herb. The third is a reference to the pikes of giant size living in an old pond. These pikes are the embodiment of the mysterious foreboding inherent in nature. The first person speaker's experiences from these three incidents not only reaffirm the horror of the killer-fish but also gradually intensify the violence and mystery in the heart of man and nature.

So, "Pike" has very powerful human resonance. In the last four stanzas, the speaker recognises the inexplicable impending horror. He becomes aware that the primitive violence is an inseparable part of human existence. This violence is the evil "otherness", the animality in man. The poem suggests that in our cosy corner of civilisation, with its quiet, domestic surface, there survive primitive forces, the merciless cannibalism.

Ted Hughes used animals in his poems not for the sake of animals but for human beings'. Discuss.

Green Land | June 20, 2021 | 0 comments

Ted Hughes had so been obsessed with animals that people humorously called him a "Zoo Laureate". Indeed many of his famous poems are based on animals. "The Jaguar", "Pike", "The Horses"," Bull Moses", "An Otter", "Thrushes" and "Crow" are a few of many of his poems dealing with animals. However, though his primary subjects are animals, his main focus is on man. He believed that the primitive energy in man was on the verge of extinction because of the continuous domination of rational consciousness. The poem, "Pike" is an excellent example of Hughes' gift for imagining and describing nature at her most violent and predatory shape. It seeks the root of primitive energy, which is violent, irrational and deadly. Hughes in this poem recognizes the primordial violent energy that defies and threatens all kinds of subordination to rational consciousness. Here lies human interest in the poem. So, "Pike" is a fine poem representing Hughes' pre-occupation with animals, his recognition of the violent primitive energy and his art of relating an animal with the primordial natural force in man.

The poet suggests the violent and deadly nature of the pike in the beginning of the poem. It opens with an objective detail of the fish:

Pike, three inches long, perfect,Pike in all parts, green tigering the gold.Killers from the egg: The malevolent aged grin.They dance...

The words "tigering", "Killers" "malevolent" and "grin" imply that the dance is a macabre celebration of timeless instinctive destructiveness. The first four stanzas present the primitive horror in the subject-creature, the pike, through a series of evocative noun phrases. The speaker appears in the fifth stanza and reinforces the violence and horror in the pike through three brief anecdotes.

The first reference is to three pikes kept in an aquarium. The strongest of them ate up the other two. The second reference is to "Two, six pounds each", which killed each other in the willow-herb. The third is a reference to the pikes of giant size living in an old pond. These pikes are the embodiment of the mysterious foreboding inherent in nature. The first person speaker's experiences from these three incidents not only reaffirm the horror of the killer-fish but also gradually intensify the violence and mystery in the heart of man and nature.

So, "Pike" has very powerful human resonance. In the last four stanzas, the speaker recognises the inexplicable impending horror. He becomes aware that the primitive violence is an inseparable part of human existence. This violence is the evil "otherness", the animality in man. The poem suggests that in our cosy corner of civilisation, with its quiet, domestic surface, there survive primitive forces, the merciless cannibalism.

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Ted Hughes is outstanding in creating images in his poems most of which are written on animals. The poem 'Pike' produces a lot of imagery in our mind's eyes very vividly. In almost every line of the poem there is some kind of image. Side by side with such images the poet describes the inherent cruelty in the pike's nature.

The opening lines of the poem provides a graphic picture of some pikes-their sizes 'three inches long', their colour 'green tiggering the gold, and the teeth the malevolent aged grin'.

We find the vivid images of the pike when the poet gives the description of the various parts of its body and its style of movement. The jaws of the pike are 'hooked clamp and fangs' the gills 'kneading quietly and the pectorals'. We find the image of its swollen belly when the poet describes 'With a sag belly and the grin it was born with. We find the picture of willow herb among which the two big pikes lie dead. More minute image of the dead pike is found when the poet says:

One jammed past its gills down the other's gullet: The outside eye stared as a vice locks The same iron in this eye Though its film shrank in death.

Again, the word picture is vivid when the poet says the hair frozen on my head and the most vivid in the last two lines:

Darkness beneath night's darkness had freed, That rose slowly towards me, watching.

Ted Hughes has used imagery to convey the intended meanings. The images have been very carefully chosen to suggest the destructive instinct of the pike. Through the images the poet has tried to convey the theme of horror and violence. The poet has used the colour imagery such as 'green' 'gold' 'emarald' 'silhouette' 'amber' and 'darkness to suggest the dauntless sanguinary nature of the pike. Similarly, the word 'grin' has been repeatedly used to imply its killing nature and the violence involved in it. So the imagery used in the poem has very effectively been used to contribute to the theme of violence, danger and death caused by the pike and that are commonly visible in natural world

Comment on the imagery in Ted Hughes' poem "Pike"

Green Land | June 19, 2021 | 0 comments

Ted Hughes is outstanding in creating images in his poems most of which are written on animals. The poem 'Pike' produces a lot of imagery in our mind's eyes very vividly. In almost every line of the poem there is some kind of image. Side by side with such images the poet describes the inherent cruelty in the pike's nature.

The opening lines of the poem provides a graphic picture of some pikes-their sizes 'three inches long', their colour 'green tiggering the gold, and the teeth the malevolent aged grin'.

We find the vivid images of the pike when the poet gives the description of the various parts of its body and its style of movement. The jaws of the pike are 'hooked clamp and fangs' the gills 'kneading quietly and the pectorals'. We find the image of its swollen belly when the poet describes 'With a sag belly and the grin it was born with. We find the picture of willow herb among which the two big pikes lie dead. More minute image of the dead pike is found when the poet says:

One jammed past its gills down the other's gullet: The outside eye stared as a vice locks The same iron in this eye Though its film shrank in death.

Again, the word picture is vivid when the poet says the hair frozen on my head and the most vivid in the last two lines:

Darkness beneath night's darkness had freed, That rose slowly towards me, watching.

Ted Hughes has used imagery to convey the intended meanings. The images have been very carefully chosen to suggest the destructive instinct of the pike. Through the images the poet has tried to convey the theme of horror and violence. The poet has used the colour imagery such as 'green' 'gold' 'emarald' 'silhouette' 'amber' and 'darkness to suggest the dauntless sanguinary nature of the pike. Similarly, the word 'grin' has been repeatedly used to imply its killing nature and the violence involved in it. So the imagery used in the poem has very effectively been used to contribute to the theme of violence, danger and death caused by the pike and that are commonly visible in natural world

readmore

Ozymandias is the Greek name for Rameses II. He was a very powerful monarch who ruled Egypt in the 13th century B. C. Rameses II had several by-names. Vasimare was one of them. The name Ozymandias has been derived from Vasimare. The name Ozymandias has attained a symbolic dimension in this poem. Shelley has sketched Ozymandias as a symbol of futile power that ironically fails the test of time.

The speaker of this sonnet tells that he met a traveller who returned from an ancient country. The traveller saw a broken statue in the desert. The statue's two legs stood on the pedestal. The body was not upon the two legs. Near them was lying the shattered face of the statue. There were frown, sneer and expression of the cruel authority in the face. It seemed that the person who made the statue could understand the king's character well and took every care to reflect it on stone. Though the sculptor and the king died long back, the broken statue still reflects the pride and cruelty of the king. The small platform on which the legs stood bore an inscription. It says:

"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

In that vast desert there was nothing except that broken statue, the sign of the ruined power. With the passage of time this symbol of auto cratic authority turned into a huge heap of ruins, lying pitifully in a lonely vast desert. The first part of the poem introduces the subject and the last part concludes it with a reflection on the universal truth that hu man power is not eternal.

The sonnet suggests Shelley's dislike for monarchs. Though Shelley does not say here anything directly against the king, his disgust for power mongers has obviously been suggested in it. He presents Ozymandias as a symbol of the universal truth that human vanity for power is meaningless. It is a glaring irony that Ozymandias, the king of kings, is gone to oblivion.

Discuss the theme of the poem Ozymandias

Green Land | June 17, 2021 | 0 comments

Ozymandias is the Greek name for Rameses II. He was a very powerful monarch who ruled Egypt in the 13th century B. C. Rameses II had several by-names. Vasimare was one of them. The name Ozymandias has been derived from Vasimare. The name Ozymandias has attained a symbolic dimension in this poem. Shelley has sketched Ozymandias as a symbol of futile power that ironically fails the test of time.

The speaker of this sonnet tells that he met a traveller who returned from an ancient country. The traveller saw a broken statue in the desert. The statue's two legs stood on the pedestal. The body was not upon the two legs. Near them was lying the shattered face of the statue. There were frown, sneer and expression of the cruel authority in the face. It seemed that the person who made the statue could understand the king's character well and took every care to reflect it on stone. Though the sculptor and the king died long back, the broken statue still reflects the pride and cruelty of the king. The small platform on which the legs stood bore an inscription. It says:

"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

In that vast desert there was nothing except that broken statue, the sign of the ruined power. With the passage of time this symbol of auto cratic authority turned into a huge heap of ruins, lying pitifully in a lonely vast desert. The first part of the poem introduces the subject and the last part concludes it with a reflection on the universal truth that hu man power is not eternal.

The sonnet suggests Shelley's dislike for monarchs. Though Shelley does not say here anything directly against the king, his disgust for power mongers has obviously been suggested in it. He presents Ozymandias as a symbol of the universal truth that human vanity for power is meaningless. It is a glaring irony that Ozymandias, the king of kings, is gone to oblivion.

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"Ozymandias" is a unique sonnet composed by Percy Bysshe Shelley, a revolutionary poet of the Romantic period. The poem is about the futility of human achievements. It mocks at human pride in power and pelf. 

The poem is a short lyric of fourteen lines. It has the form of a son net. However, unlike a sonnet, it has three narrators: the I-speaker, the traveller and the king. The observations of these narrators have been accommodated to the sonnet form. In the octave or first eight lines, the speaker introduces the traveller who narrates the broken statue, its sur rounding and the impression reflected by the shattered face of it. In the sestet or in the last six lines, the traveller quotes the inscription on the pedestal. The inscription says that the statue is of Ozymandias who was the king of kings. He was more powerful than other kings were, and so, he was proud of his power. But with the passage of time this symbol of auto cratic authority turned into a huge heap of ruins lying pitifully in a lonely vast desert. This part ends with a comment on the meaninglessness of human power. The octave, thus, introduces the subject and the sestet concludes it with a comment on the futility of power on earth.

This sonnet differs from other sonnets in its rhyme scheme. It has an unusual rhyme scheme: ababa cdc ede fef. It is neither a Petrarchan nor a Spenserian sonnet; nor it is a Shakespearean sonnet. It seems that the poet has intentionally used an unusual rhyme scheme to match the hard reality about power and its futility. The smooth going Petrarchan or Shakespearean rhyme scheme would not match the high sounding boast, the ups and downs of a power-blinded king and the terrible horror hid den in the pride of power.The diction of this sonnet has also been chosen to suit the subject of the poem. The poem lacks the lyricism natural to Shelley. Shelley is a great lyricist; his other poems are marked with felicity of diction, easeful movements of the verses. But in this poem, there are hard-sounding words, which slow down the movement and at times, create halting effect. For example, "trunk less", "shattered", "sculptor", "Pedestal", "Ozymandias" and so on are hard sounding words which hinder the smooth running of the verse lines. These words, however, reflect the ups and downs of autocratic power.

"Ozymandias" is, therefore, an exquisite sonnet. It deals with the truth that human pride in worldly achievement is very temporary. Shelley's use of an exceptional rhyme scheme and a matching diction sug gest the irony of power on earth. Shelley's presentation of the hard truth implies his dislike for the despotic rulers.

Ozymandias as a sonnet

Green Land | June 17, 2021 | 0 comments

"Ozymandias" is a unique sonnet composed by Percy Bysshe Shelley, a revolutionary poet of the Romantic period. The poem is about the futility of human achievements. It mocks at human pride in power and pelf. 

The poem is a short lyric of fourteen lines. It has the form of a son net. However, unlike a sonnet, it has three narrators: the I-speaker, the traveller and the king. The observations of these narrators have been accommodated to the sonnet form. In the octave or first eight lines, the speaker introduces the traveller who narrates the broken statue, its sur rounding and the impression reflected by the shattered face of it. In the sestet or in the last six lines, the traveller quotes the inscription on the pedestal. The inscription says that the statue is of Ozymandias who was the king of kings. He was more powerful than other kings were, and so, he was proud of his power. But with the passage of time this symbol of auto cratic authority turned into a huge heap of ruins lying pitifully in a lonely vast desert. This part ends with a comment on the meaninglessness of human power. The octave, thus, introduces the subject and the sestet concludes it with a comment on the futility of power on earth.

This sonnet differs from other sonnets in its rhyme scheme. It has an unusual rhyme scheme: ababa cdc ede fef. It is neither a Petrarchan nor a Spenserian sonnet; nor it is a Shakespearean sonnet. It seems that the poet has intentionally used an unusual rhyme scheme to match the hard reality about power and its futility. The smooth going Petrarchan or Shakespearean rhyme scheme would not match the high sounding boast, the ups and downs of a power-blinded king and the terrible horror hid den in the pride of power.The diction of this sonnet has also been chosen to suit the subject of the poem. The poem lacks the lyricism natural to Shelley. Shelley is a great lyricist; his other poems are marked with felicity of diction, easeful movements of the verses. But in this poem, there are hard-sounding words, which slow down the movement and at times, create halting effect. For example, "trunk less", "shattered", "sculptor", "Pedestal", "Ozymandias" and so on are hard sounding words which hinder the smooth running of the verse lines. These words, however, reflect the ups and downs of autocratic power.

"Ozymandias" is, therefore, an exquisite sonnet. It deals with the truth that human pride in worldly achievement is very temporary. Shelley's use of an exceptional rhyme scheme and a matching diction sug gest the irony of power on earth. Shelley's presentation of the hard truth implies his dislike for the despotic rulers.

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