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The theme of the evil of imperialism lies at the centre of the novel heart of darkness perhaps joseph conrad s main objective in this novel is to show the imperialist exploitation of a backward country by a civilized nation conrad s treatment of this theme was that dark country.

Theme of imperialism

The keynote of the theme of imperialism may be traced at the very beging of marlow s narration the conquest of another country says marlow mostly means the taking away all things from those who have in the congo clearly show that the whitemen there failed experiences in the congo clearly show that the whitemen there failed to performance their duties instead of civilizing the Savage  natives the whitemen turned into exploiters the congo was at that time being governed by the Belgian king Leopold ii and the Belgian trading company was sending its agents into the congo for trading purposes. ivory was the chief commodity they sought for trading purposes ivory was the chief commodity they sought for later on we see that ivory not only dominates the thoughts of Mr kurtz the agent of the belgian trading company but also has become an obsession with him the ivory symbolizes the whitemen's greed and commercial mentality their chief concern in the congo is to collect ivory although they profess that they have come to civilize the natives nowhere do we find any mention of any service being rendered by these whitemen to the natives of congo.

A glorious example of evil and selfishness we find in mr kurtz.he has begun to identify himself with the Savages instead of improving their way of life he has himself become a Savage in their company actually heart of darkness portrays in a nutshell the deceit robberies murder slave trading and general policy of cruelty of the Belgian rule in the congo Conrad in this novel not only exposes the hollowness and the weakness of the Belgian imperialist rule over the congo but also reminds us of the British imperialism in various countries of the world of his time.

To sum up the Belgian trading company went to the then dark continent the congo to civilize the  natives there but ironically they became uncivilized and brutish for material gains they turned out to be seasoned schemers and plotters Joseph Conrad conveys his strong disapproval of these whitemen to us most effectively and his purpose is to raise in us the greatest possible contempt for these whitemen.

How does Conrad treat the theme of imperialism in Heart of Darkness?

Literaturemini | July 26, 2020 | 0 comments
The theme of the evil of imperialism lies at the centre of the novel heart of darkness perhaps joseph conrad s main objective in this novel is to show the imperialist exploitation of a backward country by a civilized nation conrad s treatment of this theme was that dark country.

Theme of imperialism

The keynote of the theme of imperialism may be traced at the very beging of marlow s narration the conquest of another country says marlow mostly means the taking away all things from those who have in the congo clearly show that the whitemen there failed experiences in the congo clearly show that the whitemen there failed to performance their duties instead of civilizing the Savage  natives the whitemen turned into exploiters the congo was at that time being governed by the Belgian king Leopold ii and the Belgian trading company was sending its agents into the congo for trading purposes. ivory was the chief commodity they sought for trading purposes ivory was the chief commodity they sought for later on we see that ivory not only dominates the thoughts of Mr kurtz the agent of the belgian trading company but also has become an obsession with him the ivory symbolizes the whitemen's greed and commercial mentality their chief concern in the congo is to collect ivory although they profess that they have come to civilize the natives nowhere do we find any mention of any service being rendered by these whitemen to the natives of congo.
Theme of imperialism

A glorious example of evil and selfishness we find in mr kurtz.he has begun to identify himself with the Savages instead of improving their way of life he has himself become a Savage in their company actually heart of darkness portrays in a nutshell the deceit robberies murder slave trading and general policy of cruelty of the Belgian rule in the congo Conrad in this novel not only exposes the hollowness and the weakness of the Belgian imperialist rule over the congo but also reminds us of the British imperialism in various countries of the world of his time.

To sum up the Belgian trading company went to the then dark continent the congo to civilize the  natives there but ironically they became uncivilized and brutish for material gains they turned out to be seasoned schemers and plotters Joseph Conrad conveys his strong disapproval of these whitemen to us most effectively and his purpose is to raise in us the greatest possible contempt for these whitemen.
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Pastoral elegies had its origin in the classical poet of ancient Greece, viz, Theocritus, Bion and Moschus. It was lyric in character and dealt with the simple life of shepherds and their day to day occupations, such as singing with their oaten pipes in the flowery meadows, piping as though they would never be old, tending their flock of sheep. The essence of pastoral poetry is simplicity of thought and action in a rustic setting.

Perhaps Arnold's two best-known poems are "The Scholar Gipsy" and "Thyrsis", which are generally labelled as pastoral elegies deeply steeping in classical lore. " The Scholar Gipsy", ostensibly about a seventeenth-century Oxford student who joined the Gypsies to learn their lore is really about the poet himself and his generation. In the poem, the scholar gypsy becomes a symbol in the light of which Arnold can develop his own position and state his own problems. Drawing on his knowledge of rustic scenes around Oxford, he produced a meditative pastoral poem whose language owes something to Theocritus but whose tone and emotional colouring are very much Arnoldian.

Arnold creates a pastoral or rural setting in "The Scholar Gipsy". The local colour of the poem is a charm of the pastoral elegy. The poem is set in the Oxford countryside which is vividly brought home to us, and it is made more beautiful and enchanting by the modifying colours of imagination. Green muffled Cumner hills and sloping pastures bright with sunshine and flowers, stripling Thames at Bab-lock -hithe, with pleasure boats, Wychwood bowers bright with flowers, the Fyfield elm where maidens dance in May, flooded fields, the causeway and the wooden bridge, Bagley Wood where gipsies pitch their tents, sparkling Thames and Godstow Bridge, abandoned lasher where rustics bathe, constitute a real landscape around Oxford, made lovely with the magic touch, of poet's imagination. It forms an ideal setting for the spiritual presence of the Scholar Gipsy.

Around addresses the friend of the Scholar Gipsy after the pastoral convention. The poet asks his companion, s Shepherd, to attend to the sheep and let loose them from the folds. Having discharged his duties, the Shepherd is advised to come to him again in the evening. But Arnold has not identified himself with a Shepherd like other pastoral poets.In the poem, his friend in quest, however, is a Shepherd.

Again, "The Scholar Gipsy" is not a pastoral elegy in its conventional sense. S pastoral elegy contains a lament for the dead. The poet mourns the death of a person in the garb of Shepherd and creates the setting of the pastoral life. But here the poet does not appear in the guise of s Shepherd nor does not mouth the death of anyone. Only his friend appears in the guise of a Shepherd in the first stanza and then we do not hear anything about him in the rest of the poem. What the poet laments in the poem is the decay of an age or vanished age.

In structure the poem is no doubt pastoral; the fairly elaborate ten-line stanza helps to keep the movement of the poem slow and develop the note of introspection. The slow movement of the verse and the stately utterances of thought are in perfect keeping with the sad, philosophical mood of the poet. But, the tone of the poem has a modern touch; the spirit permeating the poem is typically Victorian- the spirit of unrest seeking spiritual illumination.The elegy writer after lamenting the physical death of his friend would bring out the immortal qualities he possessed.

The elegy always ends with a note of hope that the subject of lamentation is not really dead, but is alive. Arnold very aptly makes use of this conversion and establishes that the Scholar Gipsy will live forever. The Scholar Gipsy has one aim, one business, one desire-the spiritual quest for truth. He has singleness of purpose. His singleness of purpose makes him immortal. "The Scholar Gipsy" is Arnold's modification of the pastoral elegy, not in a strict sense. The pastoral elements are found in the first half of the poem (stanzas 1-13) in the description of the Oxford countryside that is travelled by the Scholar Gipsy; the criticism of Victorian life in the second half (stanzas 14-25) where by a simple process of confrontation the scholar gipsy's happiness and singleness of mind are used to undermine what Arnold felt to be wrong in his own life and the lives of his contemporaries.

Discuss "The Scholar Gipsy" as a pastoral elegy?

Green Land | July 15, 2020 | 0 comments
Pastoral elegies had its origin in the classical poet of ancient Greece, viz, Theocritus, Bion and Moschus. It was lyric in character and dealt with the simple life of shepherds and their day to day occupations, such as singing with their oaten pipes in the flowery meadows, piping as though they would never be old, tending their flock of sheep. The essence of pastoral poetry is simplicity of thought and action in a rustic setting.
The Scholar Gipsy" as a pastoral elegy

Perhaps Arnold's two best-known poems are "The Scholar Gipsy" and "Thyrsis", which are generally labelled as pastoral elegies deeply steeping in classical lore. " The Scholar Gipsy", ostensibly about a seventeenth-century Oxford student who joined the Gypsies to learn their lore is really about the poet himself and his generation. In the poem, the scholar gypsy becomes a symbol in the light of which Arnold can develop his own position and state his own problems. Drawing on his knowledge of rustic scenes around Oxford, he produced a meditative pastoral poem whose language owes something to Theocritus but whose tone and emotional colouring are very much Arnoldian.

Arnold creates a pastoral or rural setting in "The Scholar Gipsy". The local colour of the poem is a charm of the pastoral elegy. The poem is set in the Oxford countryside which is vividly brought home to us, and it is made more beautiful and enchanting by the modifying colours of imagination. Green muffled Cumner hills and sloping pastures bright with sunshine and flowers, stripling Thames at Bab-lock -hithe, with pleasure boats, Wychwood bowers bright with flowers, the Fyfield elm where maidens dance in May, flooded fields, the causeway and the wooden bridge, Bagley Wood where gipsies pitch their tents, sparkling Thames and Godstow Bridge, abandoned lasher where rustics bathe, constitute a real landscape around Oxford, made lovely with the magic touch, of poet's imagination. It forms an ideal setting for the spiritual presence of the Scholar Gipsy.

Around addresses the friend of the Scholar Gipsy after the pastoral convention. The poet asks his companion, s Shepherd, to attend to the sheep and let loose them from the folds. Having discharged his duties, the Shepherd is advised to come to him again in the evening. But Arnold has not identified himself with a Shepherd like other pastoral poets.In the poem, his friend in quest, however, is a Shepherd.

Again, "The Scholar Gipsy" is not a pastoral elegy in its conventional sense. S pastoral elegy contains a lament for the dead. The poet mourns the death of a person in the garb of Shepherd and creates the setting of the pastoral life. But here the poet does not appear in the guise of s Shepherd nor does not mouth the death of anyone. Only his friend appears in the guise of a Shepherd in the first stanza and then we do not hear anything about him in the rest of the poem. What the poet laments in the poem is the decay of an age or vanished age.

In structure the poem is no doubt pastoral; the fairly elaborate ten-line stanza helps to keep the movement of the poem slow and develop the note of introspection. The slow movement of the verse and the stately utterances of thought are in perfect keeping with the sad, philosophical mood of the poet. But, the tone of the poem has a modern touch; the spirit permeating the poem is typically Victorian- the spirit of unrest seeking spiritual illumination.The elegy writer after lamenting the physical death of his friend would bring out the immortal qualities he possessed.

The elegy always ends with a note of hope that the subject of lamentation is not really dead, but is alive. Arnold very aptly makes use of this conversion and establishes that the Scholar Gipsy will live forever. The Scholar Gipsy has one aim, one business, one desire-the spiritual quest for truth. He has singleness of purpose. His singleness of purpose makes him immortal. "The Scholar Gipsy" is Arnold's modification of the pastoral elegy, not in a strict sense. The pastoral elements are found in the first half of the poem (stanzas 1-13) in the description of the Oxford countryside that is travelled by the Scholar Gipsy; the criticism of Victorian life in the second half (stanzas 14-25) where by a simple process of confrontation the scholar gipsy's happiness and singleness of mind are used to undermine what Arnold felt to be wrong in his own life and the lives of his contemporaries.
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In "The Scholar Gipsy" Arnold's attitude to the gipsy is closely analogue to that of an adult towards child. He appreciates even envies its innocence, but realizes that there is no return to such state is possible for himself. The child loses its 'innocence' not by some act of sin or by a defect of intellect, but merely by gaining experience and developing into an adult. The realities of adult life turn out to be less agreeable. The gipsy, like a child, is the embodiment of a good lost, not of a good temporarily or culpably mislaid. When Arnold contrasts the gipsy's serenity with the disquiets and perplexities of his own age, he is not satirizing the nineteenth century, or renouncing it, or criticizing it, or suggesting a remedy, he is rather, exploring its spiritual and emotional losses, and the stoic readjustment which this will entail for it:  

 -No, no thou hast not felt the lapse of hours!  For what wears out of the life of mortal men? 'Tis that form change to change their bearing rolls;"

The Scholar Gipsy" is not an elegy of a personal sorrow because of the death of any dear one. What the poet laments in the poem is the decay of an age or vanished age. In the poem he laments the life of the modern men who have no fixed purpose in life. They are fully materialistic and have very little faith in religion. They always run after money and spend all their energies on a thousand schemes. Their life consists of a series of changes. They cannot stick to anything for long. They are like rolling stones that gather no moss. As a result they receive a series of shocks and lose vitality of mind, They grow old and feeble going through many ups and downs in course of their lives. They go through joys and sorrows of life, which has a tiring effect on them. They undertake too many works and do not attain fruition in any of them. Frustrations and disappointments are always in store for them. So their minds are completely worn out and thus they meet their spiritual death. They remain where they had been at the beginning without achieving any significant goal. Thus, Arnold portrays modern life as a diseased one.

But the Scholar Gipsy chooses to live away from the strange disease of modern man. He does not hanker after material gain and passion of life. He seeks divine inspiration to learn the gipsy lore which, he thinks, will be beneficial for mankind. He was born in an age when people were not racked by doubts and despair. Science and rationalism which proved the bane of the modern age were not there. Life was care-free and flowed smoothly like the sparking Thames. Like the modern man he did not suffer from the sick hurry and divided aims of the modern man. He had one aim, one business, one desire. He spent all his energies on his singleness of purpose. His fixity of purpose made him immortal. Hence, Arnold asks the Scholar Gipsy to avoid the contact of the modern man. Once he comes in contact with the modern man, he will lose his faith, purpose and habitual cheerfulness of mind.

Thus, Arnold's melancholy has a lofty ideal and throw a heavenly light on the minds of the troubled mankind. It does not, however, have an unnerving effect. His melancholy has indeed a meaning and a message. It guides mankind in their spiritual endeavours and struggle for perfection with a singleness of purpose and spirit of dedication.

Discuss the elegiac quality of Arnold's "Scholar Gipsy".

Green Land | July 15, 2020 | 0 comments
Matthew Arnold is the greatest elegiac poet in the world of poetry. His most famous elegiac poems are "The Scholar Gipsy", " Thyrsis", "Dover Beach", " A Summer Night ", " Rugby Chapel ". His elegiac poetry is more than a mere expression of sorrow. His poetry invariably becomes reflective and philosophical. Poetry according to Matthew Arnold is a criticism of life. This is quite true about his own poetry. Garrod rightly says: " His poetry, profoundly melancholic, runs from the world, runs from it, as I think, hurt, hurt in some vital part. It believes itself able to sustain life only in the shade." His poetry is a spontaneous expression of " his native melancholy, of the Virgilian cry over the mournfulness of mortal destiny".
the elegiac quality of Arnold's

In "The Scholar Gipsy" Arnold's attitude to the gipsy is closely analogue to that of an adult towards child. He appreciates even envies its innocence, but realizes that there is no return to such state is possible for himself. The child loses its 'innocence' not by some act of sin or by a defect of intellect, but merely by gaining experience and developing into an adult. The realities of adult life turn out to be less agreeable. The gipsy, like a child, is the embodiment of a good lost, not of a good temporarily or culpably mislaid. When Arnold contrasts the gipsy's serenity with the disquiets and perplexities of his own age, he is not satirizing the nineteenth century, or renouncing it, or criticizing it, or suggesting a remedy, he is rather, exploring its spiritual and emotional losses, and the stoic readjustment which this will entail for it:  

 -No, no thou hast not felt the lapse of hours!  For what wears out of the life of mortal men? 'Tis that form change to change their bearing rolls;"

The Scholar Gipsy" is not an elegy of a personal sorrow because of the death of any dear one. What the poet laments in the poem is the decay of an age or vanished age. In the poem he laments the life of the modern men who have no fixed purpose in life. They are fully materialistic and have very little faith in religion. They always run after money and spend all their energies on a thousand schemes. Their life consists of a series of changes. They cannot stick to anything for long. They are like rolling stones that gather no moss. As a result they receive a series of shocks and lose vitality of mind, They grow old and feeble going through many ups and downs in course of their lives. They go through joys and sorrows of life, which has a tiring effect on them. They undertake too many works and do not attain fruition in any of them. Frustrations and disappointments are always in store for them. So their minds are completely worn out and thus they meet their spiritual death. They remain where they had been at the beginning without achieving any significant goal. Thus, Arnold portrays modern life as a diseased one.

But the Scholar Gipsy chooses to live away from the strange disease of modern man. He does not hanker after material gain and passion of life. He seeks divine inspiration to learn the gipsy lore which, he thinks, will be beneficial for mankind. He was born in an age when people were not racked by doubts and despair. Science and rationalism which proved the bane of the modern age were not there. Life was care-free and flowed smoothly like the sparking Thames. Like the modern man he did not suffer from the sick hurry and divided aims of the modern man. He had one aim, one business, one desire. He spent all his energies on his singleness of purpose. His fixity of purpose made him immortal. Hence, Arnold asks the Scholar Gipsy to avoid the contact of the modern man. Once he comes in contact with the modern man, he will lose his faith, purpose and habitual cheerfulness of mind.

Thus, Arnold's melancholy has a lofty ideal and throw a heavenly light on the minds of the troubled mankind. It does not, however, have an unnerving effect. His melancholy has indeed a meaning and a message. It guides mankind in their spiritual endeavours and struggle for perfection with a singleness of purpose and spirit of dedication.
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The Windhover" by Gerald Manley Hopkins is a semi-romantic, religious poem dedicated to Christ. It is a usual Hopkinsian sonnet that begins with description of nature and ends in meditation about God and Christ and his beauty, greatness and grace. The poem also uses his usual "sprung rhythm", Anglo-Saxon diction, alliteration, internal rhyming, new compound metaphors, elliptical grammar and complex threads of connotation. Hopkins has mixed his romantic fascination with the nature with his religious favor of gratitude towards God for giving us a beautiful nature. The beauty of nature is hear illustrated by a wonderful bird flying in the air. He describes a bird which he saw flying in the sky that morning. Like in a romantic poem, he remembers the experience to express his feelings. That morning, the poem, we can infer that the speaker was probably in the field. His attention was suddenly drawn by the scene of a bird flying in the sky. " The Windhover is a sonnet whose octave describes the flight of a kestrel (windhover) that he saw that morning. The sestet is divided into two parts: the first three lines are about the bird and the comparison of the bird with Christ who is 'a billion times lovelier', and the last three lines express his memories and appreciation of Christ. But the poem is rather difficult because the poet has used odd old English words, only implications, and Christian symbols to suggest the pain (gall), wound (gash) ,blood (vermilion), sacrifice, and so the greatness of Christ. The bottom-line of the difficult ideas in this poem is that 'it is because of the sacrifice of Christ that we have such a life, and we can enjoy the majestic beauty of the nature: so we should thank him. The poem is almost impossible to understand without good background knowledge about Hopkins's ideas and his odd words. There are many words of the Anglo-Saxon origin like "rung" (past tense of 'ring' meaning go round), "minion", "dauphin", "chevalier" (prince), etc. There are also unusual combinations like "dapple-dawn-drawn", which is an image of the bird. The last stanza is particularly complex because of the associatively linked words related to Christ and his sacrifice. Finally, the  grammar is also odd; actually the poem does not follow any traditional grammar and structure. In short, the poem can be discussed as a sonnet because it has some of the features of the typical sonnet, but it must be called a modified sonnet adapted to a different kind of subject, word-game and music.

The Windhover poem tone !!

Literaturemini | July 15, 2020 | 0 comments
The Windhover" by Gerald Manley Hopkins is a semi-romantic, religious poem dedicated to Christ. It is a usual Hopkinsian sonnet that begins with description of nature and ends in meditation about God and Christ and his beauty, greatness and grace. The poem also uses his usual "sprung rhythm", Anglo-Saxon diction, alliteration, internal rhyming, new compound metaphors, elliptical grammar and complex threads of connotation. Hopkins has mixed his romantic fascination with the nature with his religious favor of gratitude towards God for giving us a beautiful nature. The beauty of nature is hear illustrated by a wonderful bird flying in the air. He describes a bird which he saw flying in the sky that morning. Like in a romantic poem, he remembers the experience to express his feelings. That morning, the poem, we can infer that the speaker was probably in the field. His attention was suddenly drawn by the scene of a bird flying in the sky. " The Windhover is a sonnet whose octave describes the flight of a kestrel (windhover) that he saw that morning. The sestet is divided into two parts: the first three lines are about the bird and the comparison of the bird with Christ who is 'a billion times lovelier', and the last three lines express his memories and appreciation of Christ. But the poem is rather difficult because the poet has used odd old English words, only implications, and Christian symbols to suggest the pain (gall), wound (gash) ,blood (vermilion), sacrifice, and so the greatness of Christ. The bottom-line of the difficult ideas in this poem is that 'it is because of the sacrifice of Christ that we have such a life, and we can enjoy the majestic beauty of the nature: so we should thank him. The poem is almost impossible to understand without good background knowledge about Hopkins's ideas and his odd words. There are many words of the Anglo-Saxon origin like "rung" (past tense of 'ring' meaning go round), "minion", "dauphin", "chevalier" (prince), etc. There are also unusual combinations like "dapple-dawn-drawn", which is an image of the bird. The last stanza is particularly complex because of the associatively linked words related to Christ and his sacrifice. Finally, the  grammar is also odd; actually the poem does not follow any traditional grammar and structure. In short, the poem can be discussed as a sonnet because it has some of the features of the typical sonnet, but it must be called a modified sonnet adapted to a different kind of subject, word-game and music.
The windhover poem tone
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Write about the form of the poem?

Literaturemini | July 15, 2020 | 0 comments
The confusing grammatical structures and sentence order in this sonnet contribute to its difficulty, but they also represent a masterful use of language. Hopkins blends and confuses adjectives, verbs, and subjects in order to echo his theme of smooth merging: the bird's perfect immersion in the air, and the fact that his self and his action are inseparable. Note, too, how important the "-ing" ending is to the poem's rhyme scheme; it occurs in verbs, adjectives, and nouns, linking the different parts of the sentences together in an intense unity. A great number of verbs are packed into a short space of lines, as Hopkins tries to nail down with as much descriptive precision as possible the exact character of the bird's motion.
Windhover poem form

"The Windhover" is written in "sprung rhythm," a meter in which the number of accents in a line is counted but the number of syllables does not matter. This technique allows Hopkins to very the speed of his lines so as to capture the bird's pausing and racing. Listen to the hovering rhythm of "the rolling level underneath him steady air," and the arched brightness of "and striding high there," The poem slows abruptly at the end, pausing in awe to reflect on Christ.
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The opening of the sestet serves as both a further elaboration on the bird's movement and an injunction to the poet's own heart. The " beauty," "valour," and "act" (like "air," "pride," and "plume") " here buckle." "Buckle" is the verb here; it denotes either a fastening (like the buckling of a belt), a coming together of these different parts of a creature's being, or an acquiescent collapse (like the "buckling" of the knees), in which all parts subordinate themselves into some larger purpose or cause. In either case, unification takes place. At the moment of this integration, a glorious fire issues forth, of the same order as the glory of Christ's life and crucifixion, though not as grand. The speaker compares the bird with Christ, "my chevalier", who is a billion times lovelier, more brute and dangerous in his beauty.the fire or brilliance of Christ is dazzling this bird is no wonder. "No wonder", says the poet about the bird because the real wonder of the world is another supreme gift of God, his son, the Christ. His steps on the soil make a resemblance of a wound when the blood-red and golden light of the sun is cast on it. The flight of the bird reminds the speaker of his Christ's crucification. The last stanza associatively brings together unrelated words, each telling something about Christ and his suffering and sacrifice for human beings. The description of the first stanza and the comparison of the second stanza are all forgotten when the poet deeply meditates and exalts in the sacrifice and greatness of Christ in the last three-line stanza. The red ember-like light of the morning sun in the horizon of the blue-bleak sky and he is lost in contemplation. By implication, the poem is therefore a poem of Thanksgiving to Christ. It is a hymn that is romantic in from but religious in theme. When the poet sees the beautiful bird, he is reminded of Christ and becomes thankful and appreciative of him. The poem's theme is therefore related to the poet's praise of Christ rather than being about the bird.

What does the windhover represent to poet?

Green Land | July 15, 2020 | 0 comments
The opening of the sestet serves as both a further elaboration on the bird's movement and an injunction to the poet's own heart. The " beauty," "valour," and "act" (like "air," "pride," and "plume") " here buckle." "Buckle" is the verb here; it denotes either a fastening (like the buckling of a belt), a coming together of these different parts of a creature's being, or an acquiescent collapse (like the "buckling" of the knees), in which all parts subordinate themselves into some larger purpose or cause. In either case, unification takes place. At the moment of this integration, a glorious fire issues forth, of the same order as the glory of Christ's life and crucifixion, though not as grand. The speaker compares the bird with Christ, "my chevalier", who is a billion times lovelier, more brute and dangerous in his beauty.the fire or brilliance of Christ is dazzling this bird is no wonder. "No wonder", says the poet about the bird because the real wonder of the world is another supreme gift of God, his son, the Christ. His steps on the soil make a resemblance of a wound when the blood-red and golden light of the sun is cast on it. The flight of the bird reminds the speaker of his Christ's crucification. The last stanza associatively brings together unrelated words, each telling something about Christ and his suffering and sacrifice for human beings. The description of the first stanza and the comparison of the second stanza are all forgotten when the poet deeply meditates and exalts in the sacrifice and greatness of Christ in the last three-line stanza. The red ember-like light of the morning sun in the horizon of the blue-bleak sky and he is lost in contemplation. By implication, the poem is therefore a poem of Thanksgiving to Christ. It is a hymn that is romantic in from but religious in theme. When the poet sees the beautiful bird, he is reminded of Christ and becomes thankful and appreciative of him. The poem's theme is therefore related to the poet's praise of Christ rather than being about the bird.
Windhover represent to the poet
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